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Quince Jam (Marmelada Kydoni)

Quince Jam (Marmelada Kydoni)

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A traditional Greek Quince Jam or Jelly (Marmelada Kydoni),  using arbaroriza (fragrant geraniums) to flavour it.

This jam is so delicious that apart from spreading it on toasted bread, you can also use it  to top Greek yoghourt, ice cream or other creamy desserts but also use it in tarts, etc.

Its going to be your kids favourite for breakfast and it’s so healthy .

quinces image

When I made this Quince Jam I wanted to make it to be somewhat like a cross between a fruit preserve and a jam.

If you want it to have more jelly, when you cook the fruit do not discard the seeds and some of its peel but fold it into a tulle and put it in the pot as most of the pectin is found in the seeds and peels.  See the picture from a previous time I had made it.

cooking quince image

The reason I made this jam like this was that I want to be able to serve it on top of creamy desserts but also use it in my recipes, the way I used it in my Chocolate & Quince Tart or in Pasta Frolla but also to be able to spread it on toasted bread or served together with cheese, such as anthotyro, graviera, halloumi or other Greek cheeses.

Breakfast with quince and anthotyros image

Have you ever wondered how this hard, tasteless and astringent fruit is transformed to the most delicious, red fruit when it is cooked?

Quince jam bottled photo

The tannin concentration in quinces varies depending on where it is grown and determines its color when cooked. The heat causes the tannins to release a red pigment called anthocyanin.

The quinces, which are rich in tannins give a reddish color while those that contain fewer tannins remain in a cream or pale pink.

Ιn past, when quince was cooked in aluminum cookware the reaction with tannic acid produced even deepest red results.

How to Make the Quince Jam

Prepare a big bowl with water and the juice of one lemon.  Peel the quinces, remove core, and put them in the water.

Quince in water and lemon juice image

When all of them are peeled, add 6 cups of the quince and lemon water in a big pot.

Quince grated image

Grate the quince, adding each grated piece directly in the pot.

Grated quince in a pot image

Add the sugar and mix until it dissolves.

Adding sugar to quince image

Add the fragrant geraniums and cinnamon and put on the heat.

Adding fragant geraniums and cinnamon to quince image

Bring to a boil, lower heat to medium high and cook, mixing regularly until the temperature reaches 105oC (220oF), for about 2 hours.

cooked quince jam image

Store in clean sterilized jars.

Quince in jars image
Syrup in quince jam before setting image

As you may see from the above picture, which I took just after the jam was ready, there was some syrup in the jam.  After a few days however that syrup became into a jelly and the jam was thicker.

Maybe another myth is busted and you don’t need to add the peels and the seeds.  However, if you do add them, I would suggest that you add more water, so that it will set into a jelly.

quince jam on dessert image

Kydonopasto:  A future recipe to post

Another way to preserve quince is to make it into Kydonopasto (Quince Jelly Paste).  The quince is cooked until all the moisture evaporates and then it has to dry.  A lovely delicacy to enjoy during the winter.

Kydonopasto image

The above recipe can easily be made into Kydonopasto but if you want more instructions, you can find the recipe in Volume 2 of my e-cookbook “Mint, Cinnamon & Blossom Water, Flavours of Cyprus, Kopiaste! or wait until I post the recipe.

Kydonopasto quince paste image

Other relevant recipes:

Quince Preserve (Glyko Kydoni)

Marmelada kydoni quince jam image

Marmelada Kydoni (Quince Jam)

Yield: 10 jars (450 grams each)
Prep Time: 1 hour
Cook Time: 2 hours 30 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours 30 minutes

Quince jam is so delicious that apart from spreading it on toasted bread, you can also use it to top creamy desserts but also used in other recipes.

Ingredients

  • 2.200 grams of peeled, cored and grated quince (3,5 kilos or about 7 medium quinces)
  • 2 kilos sugar
  • 6 cups water
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 5 fragrant geranium leaves
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • Juice from 1 lemon

Instructions

  1. Prepare a big bowl with water and the juice of one lemon. Peel the quinces and remove core and put them in the water.
  2. When they are all ready, add 6 cups of the quince and lemon water in a big pot.
  3. Grate the quince, adding each grated piece directly in the pot.
  4. Add the sugar and mix until it dissolves.
  5. Add the fragrant geraniums and cinnamon and put on the heat.
  6. Bring to a boil, lower heat to medium high and cook, mixing regularly until the temperature reaches 105oC (220oF), for about 2 hours and thirty minutes.
  7. Place in clean sterilized jars.

Notes

Make 10 jars (500 grams each)

Nutrition Information
Yield 10 Serving Size 1
Amount Per Serving Calories 791Total Fat 0gSaturated Fat 0gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 0gCholesterol 0mgSodium 22mgCarbohydrates 204gFiber 0gSugar 203gProtein 0g

"These values are automatically calculated and offered for guidance only. Their accuracy is not guaranteed."

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Jams and Marmalades

Some more homemade jams and marmalades

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collage Quince jam image

Kopiaste and Kali Orexi,

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Angie

Sunday 19th of October 2014

I always thought jam and preserve were the same...this looks great on some homemade bread for the breakfast. Thanks for sharing, Ivy.

Rosa

Saturday 18th of October 2014

Divine!

Cheers,

Rosa

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