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Celeriac and how to use it

Celeriac and how to use it

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Celeriac, in Greek σελινόριζα = pr. seh-lee-NOH-ree-zah, also known as celery root, is a root vegetable which looks strange and peculiar, somewhat ugly and repulsive but it is tasty, with a lot of health benefits.

Celeriac-root-image

In Greece, it is know and used since antiquity as it is mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey, as “selinon”.

Do not confuse celeriac with the celery leaves we buy in the supermarket. They are both of the same family (Apium raveolens, variety rapaceum) but celeriac is cultivated for its root, whereas celery (in the family Apiaceae), is cultivated for its long, fibrous stalks.

The most popular Greek dish is Chirino me Selinoriza (Pork with Celeriac).  

See also my other recipes with Celeriac: Kotsi Chirino (Braised Pork Shank) with Celeriac and Artichoke and Celeriac Soup.

Health benefits of celeriac

Celeriac contains plenty of minerals including calcium, iron, magnesium and potassium. It contains several of the B vitamins as well as vitamin C and vitamin K.

Vitamin K is good to improve bone strength, which can protect us from osteroporosis as well as improve brain function, by limiting neuronal damage in the brain, especially against Alzheimer’s disease.

Celeriac is low in calories (42 calories in 100 grams peeled celeriac)  and therefore, good for anyone on a low-carb diet, especially those on a Gallbladder Diet.

Like most of the members of Apiaceae family vegetables, celeriac is also rich in antioxidants. 

One of the main reasons that many avoid celeriac is that they do not know how to use it or how to clean it.  

Fortunately, in recent years, we have discovered more and more ways to use it and  incorporate it in our diet.  

Harvesting and storage of celeriac

One of the joys of having celeriac in the fridge is that it lasts for several weeks.

This means you can always count on there being a vegetable that’s edible in the fridge if you’ve not made it to the supermarket for a while.  

Celeriac matures during fall, although it can last all winter, or even more, if stored properly.

Trim side roots and leaves and store in the refrigerator around 0 – 5 degrees C / 32 – 41 F. However, it does not stand up to freezing.

Its size ranges between 200 – 500 grams each and a regular root is about the size of a grapefruit.

How to use celeriac

Celeriac may be eaten raw in salads, roasted, stewed, or blanched, and may be mashed.

It can be eaten raw in salads, cooked and pureed to accompany meat (especially pork) and fish, stewed like many other root vegetables, in casseroles, in soups and generally in other recipes where celery is added.

How does celeriac taste

It resembles like celery but without the intense celery taste, with a more mild and sweet taste and smell.

How to clean celeriac

Celeriac root before cleaning image

Cleaning celeriac is very easy.  First of all start by washing the root.   Do not try to clean it as the potato, because that’s not the way.  

You will need a cutting board and a sharp knife, as a lot of skin will be removed and possibly a peeler.  

Put it on the cutting board and cut the base so that it can sit flat on the board and cut the top.

Work your knife down the sides to remove the knobs and roots until its pale, creamy flesh is revealed. 

Celeriac after cleaning image

If there are some rough spots you may also need a sturdy peeler – corer.

When done, put it in water with lemon juice in order to prevent it from oxidizing.

Celeriac-root-image

How to Clean Celeriac

Yield: 1
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Difficulty: medium
Estimated Cost: 1 - 2 Euros

Celeriac root is a winter vegetable which looks ugly and many do not know how to clean and use it.

See how I clean it.

Materials

  • 1 Celeriac Root
  • Lemon juice
  • Water

Tools

  • Cutting board
  • Sharp knife
  • Peeler - corer
  • Bowl

Instructions

HOW TO CLEAN CELERIAC

  1. Cleaning celeriac is very easy.  First of all start by washing the root.  
  2. Do not try to clean it as the potato, because that’s not the way.  
  3. Put it on the cutting board and cut the top and base so that it can sit flat on the board.
  4. Work your knife down the sides to remove the knobs and roots until its pale, creamy flesh is revealed. 
  5. If there are some rough spots you may also need a sturdy peeler – corer.
  6. When done, put it in water with lemon juice in order to prevent it from oxidizing.

Did you make this project?

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Collage Celeriac Root and How to Clean it

Kopiaste and Kali Orexi!

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Elly

Saturday 16th of August 2008

Yum, Ivy. What a great way to use up leftovers. I've actually only had bulgur in tabbouli; I really should cook it in other applications. Thanks for the inspiration!

Rosie

Friday 15th of August 2008

I really do love to read about left-overs being made into another meal and this sounds and looks yummy Ivy :)

Rosie x

Bellini Valli

Friday 15th of August 2008

When I found that video of the Cypriot couple called "Greek meatballs" they also had a recipe for pilafi. I have been measning to try this so thanks for the reminder Sis:D

Cynthia

Thursday 14th of August 2008

Somehow I always never feel inclined to turn the leftovers into a new dish, well except fried rice. :)

giz

Thursday 14th of August 2008

I love the way you use up your ingredients. I go crazy when I feel like I have to throw anything away. I would even make this with barley - it would be delicious.

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