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Greek Potato Salad with Mayonnaise

Greek Potato Salad with Mayonnaise

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An easy and delicious Greek Potato salad made with mayonnaise, extra virgin olive oil and Greek yoghurt. It is perfect to accompany you meat dishes, served as a light dinner or even add it in your sandwiches.

This potato salad is much healthier than a usual potato salad as their is very little mayonnaise in it but it still creamy and delicious because of the Greek yoghurt and extra virgin olive oil.

Collage Potato salad photo

How to make the Greek Potato Salad

  • Scrub and wash the potatoes well. Boil them with the skin on, for about 30 – 35 minutes, until pierced easily with a fork. If you prefer to peel them before boiling them, you can do that but I prefer them with the skin on, as they do not absorb a lot of water.
  • When the potatoes become soft, peel them under running tap water, so as not to burn your hands.
  • Cut the potatoes into smaller pieces and put them in a bowl. Add half the olive oil as they become much tastier when absorbing the olive oil.
  • Boil the eggs for ten minutes or use leftover Easter eggs. Peel and cut them into smaller pieces.
  • Put the mayonnaise, the extra virgin olive oil, the Greek yoghurt, the mustard and the lemon juice in a jar, close with the lid and shake it well to combine all the ingredients. Pour the sauce over the potatoes while still warm and mix well.
  • Season with salt, pepper and sweet paprika. Add all the remaining ingredients and mix again until well combined.
  • Refrigerate for at least half an hour before serving as a side dish or as a light lunch or dinner.

After a friend’s comment on the potato salad recipe, I remembered a story of how potato was introduced to the Greeks.
I quote from Wikipedia:

Introduction of the Potato in Greece

The way Capodistrias introduced the cultivation of the potato remains famously anecdotal today.

Capodistrias statue in Nafplio image

Having ordered a shipment of potatoes, at first he ordered that they should be offered to anyone who would be interested.

However the potatoes were met with indifference by the population and the whole scheme seemed to be failing.

Therefore, Capodistrias, knowing of the contemporary Greek attitudes, ordered that the whole shipment of potatoes be unloaded in public display on the docks of Nafplion, and placed severe-looking guards guarding it.

Soon, rumours circulated that for the potatoes to be so well guarded they had to be of great importance.

People would gather to look at the so-important potatoes and soon some tried to steal them. The guards had been ordered in advance to turn a blind eye to such behaviour, and soon the potatoes had all been “stolen” and Capodistria’s plan to introduce them to Greece had succeeded!!”

Patatosalata image

Greek Potato Salad with Mayonnaise

Yield: 6
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes

An easy and delicious Greek Potato salad made with mayonnaise, extra virgin olive oil and Greek yoghurt. It is perfect to accompany you meat dishes, served as a light dinner or even add it in your sandwiches.

Ingredients

  • 1 kilo baby potatoes
  • 4 hard boiled eggs
  • 3 tbsp parsley finely chopped
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp mild mustard
  • 1 tbsp capers
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • ¼ tsp sweet paprika

Sauce:

  • 75 ml mayonnaise
  • 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp mild mustard
  • 4 tbsp Greek yoghurt
  • ¼ cup lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Wash and boil the potatoes with the skin on, for about 30 – 35 minutes until soft.
  2. Peel the potatoes while they are still hot and put them in a bowl.  Drizzle with half the olive oil.
  3. Boil the eggs for 10 minutes.  Put them in cold water to cool.  Peel and cut them into smaller pieces.
  4. Αdd the onion, capers and parsley.
  5. Put the mayonnaise in a jar and add the Greek yoghurt, the olive oil, the mustard and the lemon juice and shake well, until well combined.
  6. Season the potatoes with the salt and pepper, paprika and add the dressing.
  7. Stir well and refrigerate for half an hour before serving.

Notes

  • Instead of Greek yoghurt you can add a thousand islands sauce.
  • If you are using bigger potatoes, you will need about 45 minutes to boil them, depending on their size. They are ready when you can pierce them with a fork.
Nutrition Information
Yield 6 Serving Size 1
Amount Per Serving Calories 385Total Fat 22gSaturated Fat 4gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 17gCholesterol 130mgSodium 620mgCarbohydrates 39gFiber 4gSugar 4gProtein 10g

"These values are automatically calculated and offered for guidance only. Their accuracy is not guaranteed."

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Collage Greek Potato Salad picture

Kopiaste and Kali Orexi!

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Ivy

Wednesday 28th of November 2007

Well, really I don't know what to say. Most of the food they claim to be Turkish they took from Byzantium. They claim that Baklavas is Turkish,(check this out http://periglwssio.blogspot.com/2006/05/blog-post_26.html) but the word baklavas is ancient Greek and means to cut into pieces. About Kapodistrias you might want to take a look at this link, about his biography.

Laurie Constantino

Tuesday 27th of November 2007

Yes, this is the story I've always been told about potatoes. I recently read on another blog called "Figs Olive Wine" that the Ottomans introduced the potato to Greece. I posted the Kapodistrias story and said maybe its not true, so I'm interested in where you got the information about the Ottomans. So far the author hasn't answered my question. We'll see! I hope it was Kapodistrias because it is such a good story!

Ivy

Monday 26th of November 2007

Yes I have more potato recipes and shall try to post them asap

Anonymous

Monday 26th of November 2007

Hi ivy, if you have any more recipes about potato salads, please post them.... Pretty please.... Thank you

Anonymous

Monday 26th of November 2007

A truly amazing story about how the potato was introduced in Greece.

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